Saturday, June 1, 2019

Daggers found in shaft graves during the bronze age :: essays research papers

The ornamental daggers of the late bronzy age found in the shaft graves at Mycenae, that date between 1550, and 1500 B.C. were do by Cretans for the mainland market. Even though these daggers were do in Crete none have ever been found there. Some other places where similar daggers have been found atomic number 18 the island of Thera, Vapheio, Pylos, and the Argire Heraeum. This shows that there was trade among all of those places during the time period that the daggers were make. Most of the daggers were found in grave circle A at Mycenae. How they were make The men who made the daggers found in the shaft graves were very skilled craftsmen. They showed contrast of color and of relief with the decoration of their work. On both sides of the daggers was a slotted silver or gold plate which would be decorated before being put on. They would decorate the plates with gold, silver, copper, alloys, and another technique known as niello. Niello is a black metal-looking alloy of sulphur, copper, silver, and usually lead, used as an inlay on engraved metal. It is considered painting in metal. The metal surface is brushed with a borax solution as a flux to help distribute the heat evenly, dusted with powdered niello, then heated. by and by cooling, the surface is scraped and shows a black pattern in the incised lines. The Egyptians argon credited with originating niello decoration, which was practiced in classical times, spread throughout Europe during the middle ages, and came into high repute in the 15th century(Encyclopedia Britannica). Even though Egypt came up with the idea, you must note that it is native work, and not merely an imported article. (Web page, 7) The attitude of the figures and of the lions, and the form of the cat, be such as no Egyptian would have executed.(Web page, 7) after the plates were decorated, they used rivets rather than a soldering technique to put the parts together. They also used the technique of inlaying on the daggers when addi ng the gold portions. They would cut a set strip of gold from a thin sheet. Then they would make undercuts and dovetails wherever the gold would be going. After that they would then put the strip of gold all over the undercuts, and use a hammer and a small wedge to bang the gold in. Decorations used on the daggers Daggers found in shaft graves during the bronze age essays research papers The ornamental daggers of the late bronze age found in the shaft graves at Mycenae, that date between 1550, and 1500 B.C. were made by Cretans for the mainland market. Even though these daggers were made in Crete none have ever been found there. Some other places where similar daggers have been found ar the island of Thera, Vapheio, Pylos, and the Argire Heraeum. This shows that there was trade among all of those places during the time period that the daggers were made. Most of the daggers were found in grave circle A at Mycenae. How they were made The men who made the daggers found in the sh aft graves were very skilled craftsmen. They showed contrast of color and of relief with the decoration of their work. On both sides of the daggers was a slotted silver or gold plate which would be decorated before being put on. They would decorate the plates with gold, silver, copper, alloys, and another technique known as niello. Niello is a black metallic alloy of sulphur, copper, silver, and usually lead, used as an inlay on engraved metal. It is considered painting in metal. The metal surface is brushed with a borax solution as a flux to help distribute the heat evenly, dusted with powdered niello, then heated. After cooling, the surface is scraped and shows a black pattern in the incised lines. The Egyptians are credited with originating niello decoration, which was practiced in classical times, spread throughout Europe during the middle ages, and came into high repute in the 15th century(Encyclopedia Britannica). Even though Egypt came up with the idea, you must note that it is native work, and not merely an imported article. (Web page, 7) The attitude of the figures and of the lions, and the form of the cat, are such as no Egyptian would have executed.(Web page, 7) After the plates were decorated, they used rivets rather than a soldering technique to put the parts together. They also used the technique of inlaying on the daggers when adding the gold portions. They would cut a narrow-minded strip of gold from a thin sheet. Then they would make undercuts and dovetails wherever the gold would be going. After that they would then put the strip of gold over the undercuts, and use a hammer and a small wedge to bang the gold in. Decorations used on the daggers

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